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Irene Mamiye

Fresh Kills

June 1 - 25

Rita Bernstein

Touched

June 1 - 25

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Open By Appointment Only June 29 & 30

GALLERY HOURS: 
Wednesday - Saturday, 10am - 5pm

 

Homage 1005A (Black Rose I), 48" x 48", Pigment Print On Canvas

Homage 1005A (Black Rose I), 48" x 48", Pigment Print On Canvas

Irene Mamiye: Fresh Kills

In Fresh Kills, Irene Mamiye addresses the unique philosophical implications of social media, technology, and the ubiquity of digital imagery. Mamiye playfully considers Roland Barthes’ philosophy in The Death of the Author by creating original works from freely available, often mass-distributed, visuals. The reanimation of this imagery marks a new stage in the lifecycle of an image, acting as the beautiful and vivacious, post-modern constructions of un-dead authors. This three-fold exhibition features digital collages, CNC-milled Plexiglas sculptures, and video shorts.

In her Homage series, Mamiye first amasses collections of Instagram posts. These appropriated images are then plugged into Photoshop to be manipulated and layered into something new. The final images are a mélange of public posts that have been recorded and recontextualized into collective digital tableaux; an original made from the ubiquitous. Similarly, the Ciphers works contain internal logic, code, and encryption that has been selectively manipulated to form the resulting Plexiglas assemblages. The transparent material acts as a real-world “filter”, or screen. The etched geometric patterns are intended to reference the pixilation and noise resulting from .jpeg compression. Adding another twist to the story of these constructions, Ciphers recently became DeCiphers on the blockchain as 1000 generatively created NFT’s which sold within days of the drop. The collection can be viewed on OpenSea.io.

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Full Stop, 10" x 10", Oil And Silk Thread On Paper

Full Stop, 10" x 10", Oil And Silk Thread On Paper

Rita Bernstein: Touched

My work is small, spare, and reticent, a conscious choice. In a world where so much seems big, loud, and competing for attention, I value what is otherwise and regret that it is often overlooked. I am interested in how little one can say and still convey meaning.”

- Rita Bernstein

Quiet and mysterious, Bernstein’s work is a catalog of tactile experiences. The artist combines her distinctive mark-making with manipulation of the paper itself through pokes, probes, strokes, squeezes, and tickles. Some pieces suggest the pages of a book or journal with scratches and diagrams that appear almost, but not quite, decipherable. Others resemble scientific or medical procedures – a smear of vaguely biological material or a tenderly sutured laceration. 

Touched presents a short survey of Bernstein’s current studio practice that includes individual framed works, diptychs and triptychs, an installation of calendar pages, and a book of stains. Each component provides a space for contemplation and empathy. Tactile sensation is, perhaps, our most primal sense, and Bernstein’s compassionate handling connects to a deeply felt shared experience of benevolence and care, the most basic definition of humanity.  

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Val Rossman - John Thornton

Val Rossman featured in John Thornton's Val Rossman, Unexpected Interference, New Paintings at Gross McCleaf

Artist Val Rossman exhibits two different but related bodies of paintings at her 3rd solo show at Gross McCleaf. She talks about her work, both the process and the philosophy that animates her.

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Benjamin Passione & Mickayel Thurin - John Thornton

Benjamin Passione & Mickayel Thurin featured in John Thornton's Family of Artists, Ben Passione, Mickayel Thurin, and the Legendary Maurice

Artists Ben Passione and Mickayel Thurin are a young couple trying to raise their son Maurice through one of the most difficult periods in memory. I got a chance to film both of their recent exhibitions and talk to, and film them, at their home in North Philadelphia.

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Michael Gallagher - John Thornton

Michael Gallagher featured in John Thornton’s Beauty and Consolation, The Art of Michael Gallagher

America and the world have been suffering through a prolonged and miserable darkness, and Michael Gallagher’s paintings of joy, color and light bring hope to all who witness them. And they align with my own favorite aesthetic, a perfection of idealized forms and shapes, with an abraded and disfiguring surface. It’s the human need for perfect beauty, stymied by the limiting realities of this world. The irony being the beauty is made more poignant through the world’s grinding sorrows.

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